Category Archives: Breads

Turkish Pide Bread

Turkish Pide Bread
Turkish Pide Bread
Sukru Showing Us How To Make His Famous Pide Bread
Sukru Showing Us How To Make His Famous Pide Bread

Another week, another night in Arbutus Breads learning all their secrets to the tastiest breads in Ireland! This week we made two breads that were definitely my favourites so far. We made a Turkish Pide bread, and also a Saffron & Almond sweet bread (will blog this later). These were both so good that I ate both loaves in their entirety on my own over the following two days.. I know, I’m a greedy guts!

The Turkish Pide was absolutely delicious. We were taught how to make this bread from Sukru, a third generation Turkish baker that has worked at Arbutus for over ten years. This guy is amazing… he was kneading dough two at a time.. one in each hand!

This recipe makes three loaves and is perfect for tear and share, great for parties with dips. The Turks often stuff these as well. I think I will try stuffing one of mine with a minced lamb mixture and drizzle it with mint yoghurt. They are also great toasted with cheese and other treats in the centre.

Apparently this delicious bread is traditionally eaten at the end of Ramadan sprinkled with sesame and sweet onion seeds. Bakers from outside of Istanbul travel to the capital for the month and earn three times their usual salary to supply the demand! People will queue for hours to make sure that they get a loaf. Honestly, I can’t imagine a better way to break a fast than with a torn piece of this delicious flat bread.

Delicious Turkish Pide Bread
Delicious Turkish Pide Bread

Ingredients (3 loaves):

1 kilo white bread flour

100g fresh yeast if proving for just 1 hour (You only need 50g fresh yeast if proving for three hours which is preferable)

50g butter melted (or 100g melted butter if you don’t use the sourdough starter listed below)

50g sourdough starter

500g fresh whole milk

18g salt (add at end of mixing)

1. Mix all ingredients in a food mixer (or bowl if working by hand) for four minutes on a low speed and then four minutes on a high speed. If mixing and kneading by hand, knead gently for about 10 to 15 minutes until it all comes together.

2. Leave it to rest for 1 hour in a bowl covered with a towel before cutting and shaping. After resting, cut the dough into three equal pieces. Knead very lightly of a minute or two using the palm of your hand until the dough comes together to form a nice little ball. Leave rest for another 10 minutes.

3. On a lightly floured surface flatten the dough with your outstretched fingers until you have a nice disk shape. Then make the pattern on the bread by using your fingers to imprint four lines vertically and horizontally on the loaf. Then join up these lines to create a circular rim. Look at the photos below for guidance. Place the bread over the backs of your hands and give it a little spin (you will feel very cool doing this) like you see people doing in pizzerias.

4. Sprinkle with sesame and sweet onion (or nigella) seeds. You can get these in health shops and they make such a difference, they’re really fragrant and delicious. Mist the dough lightly with a little water.  Place in a hot oven preheated to around 220C for about 10 minutes or so, you want it lightly golden on top, but not too crusty as this is meant to be a light soft bread.

Soft Springy Dough
Soft Springy Dough
Portion Up The Dough
Portion Up The Dough
Knead The Dough Lightly
Knead The Dough Lightly
Flatten Out The Dough Into A Disc Shape
Flatten Out The Dough Into A Disc Shape
Make Your Indentations In The Dough
Make Your Indentations In The Dough
Shaped and Patterned Dough
Shaped and Patterned Dough
Sprinkle With Sesame and Sweet Onion Seeds
Sprinkle With Sesame and Sweet Onion Seeds
Pide Is Ready For The Oven
Pide Is Ready For The Oven
Spray With Water and Throw In Oven
Spray With Water and Throw In Oven
Pide Hot From The Oven
Pide Hot From The Oven
Let Cool On A Wire Rack
Let Cool On A Wire Rack

Brown Yeast Bread

Brown Yeast Bread
Brown Yeast Bread

I have just finished my second class of the 4 week Arbutus Bread Course and I am really enjoying it, so much so that I’m already disappointed that I’m half way through the course. I want to keep going there every week to eat and learn about bread forever! Its so much fun to go every week to listen and learn from Declan Ryan about the art of making artisan bread. You can see how passionate he is about break making as his face literally lights up when he talks about it and his past experiences in different bakeries across the world.

This week we learnt how to make Sourdough and Brown Yeast Bread. Their Brown Yeast Bread is really amazing and totally unlike any other brown bread you will have tried. Its really moist, have a bit of a chew and is  not dense like traditional brown sodas. It also has the most amazing sesame seed crust… delicious! It also only requires one prove and so is probably the speediest yeast bread you can make.

There is a funny history behind this particular loaf, and it seems there is a bit of a debate as to who has the naming rights to it! It was invented by Doris Grant, the wife of a cardiologist who was striving to make a delicious, healthy, fibre filled bread and so is it is also known as a Grant Loaf. However in Ireland it is often referred to as “Ballymaloe Bread”. Myrtle Allen founder of Ballymaloe House was taught this recipe by Stephen Pearce’s (the Irish potter) mother many years ago, and it has become a Ballymaloe staple and so now is known as Ballymaloe Bread in Ireland. Isn’t it interesting to know all the history behind this humble loaf?

I also left the course this week with a mighty goody bag from Arbutus including a pot of their starter, some fresh yeast and French T65 flour. I am totally equipped to recreate this  at home this weekend, and a good friend has volunteered to be my guinea pig. I hope that I manage to recreate it well, but honestly I am more worried about killing the pot of Arbutus starter Declan gave me… It’s almost 20 years old and delicious! Keeping a starter has been compared to keeping a pet, and my track record with pets isn’t great, so here’s hoping my starter has a long healthy life!

Learning A Few Extra Tricks
Learning A Few Extra Tricks

Ingredients:

300g Wholemeal flour (Try Macroom Wholewheat Stoneground)
150g of white flour
9g salt
360ml water at 40C
7g fresh yeast (or 3g dry yeast)
9g Malt extract or Molasses (You can use honey if stuck but you won’t get the nice brown colour)
Sourdough Starter (around 100ml or a handful click here for recipe of how to make sourdough starter)

1. Dissolve yeast and malt extract in the warm water.
2. Place flour and salt in a bowl making a well in the centre and gradually add the water mixture. Using your hands combine all the ingredients into a dough (which will seem quite wet and very squidgy but this is normal!)
3. Place the dough in a well oiled baking LB tin, cover with a sprinkle of flour and leave it to rise for about an hour at room temperature.
4. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas Mark 6, bake for 30-40 minutes. The bread should sound hollow when tapped on the base if fully cooked. Return to the oven out of the tin for 5/10 minutes to crisp up the sides and base. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

After Mixing Pop Into Oiled Tins
After Mixing Pop Into Oiled Tins
Leave To Prove
Leave To Prove
Ready For The Oven
Ready For The Oven
In They Go
In They Go
Our Beauties Hot From The Oven
Our Beauties Hot From The Oven
Perfect
Perfect

Ciabatta

The Arbutus Ciabatta
The Arbutus Ciabatta
My Ciabattas
My Ciabattas

This week I started a four week bread making course with Arbutus Breads, and it was something I have been looking forward to for ages and ages. Food is one of my favourite things about coming home to Cork, and Arbutus is one of the best artisan food companies around, it’s certainly the best bakery in Ireland. Their Latvian Rye with caraway seeds is my favourite, but all their breads are amazing, you really have to just taste them to understand where are the hype is coming from.

Declan Ryan was the first Michelen star chef in Ireland with his famous Arbutus Lodge restaurant which he ran for many years. After retiring from the restaurant business he started up the Arbutus Bread Company which is now a household name in Cork for the best in artisan bread. He trained with some of the most famous French bakers using traditional methods. The Arbutus Breads course is ran with his son Darragh one night a week for four weeks, and we will be doing a couple of breads a week.

The first class was really educational and it was so nice to listen to Declan’s stories of how he learn the art of traditional French bread making from great names in baking such as Pierre Nury and Xavier Honorin. He even had an old photo album of pictures of the bakeries he learnt in, the types of bread he made and methods he used which was amazing to get to see.

This week we made Ciabatta which is so handy to have in your repertoire.  I think successful bread making at home is all about confidence. It seems really intimidating at first but you just need to keep trying and not be disheartened by the fact that your first attempt may be an epic fail, and the second may not exactly win a beauty pageant. But persevere and you’ll get the knack quickly enough!

Declan Sharing His Baking Stories From His Travels
Declan Sharing His Baking Stories From His Travels
Declan Showing Us The Treats That Have Been Proving
Declan Showing Us The Treats That Have Been Proving
Darragh's Danishes
Darragh’s Danishes

Ingredients:

420g (approx) T65 or Type 00 flour (Strong white unbleached will do, but try a good deli for some of the T65 or Type 00)

7g salt

64g sourdough starter (for recipe on how to make starter click here)

4g Fresh yeast (Or 2g dried yeast)

190ml water (tepid)

1. Mix ingredients together in a mixer with a paddle attachment, or by hand for 5 to 10 minutes. It’s a very wet loose mix so don’t worry that it looks a bit sloppy. Declan suggested mixing it until it becomes glossy.

2. When all ingredients are combined put the dough in a large container, cover it and let prove  (sit) for around two hours, in a warm area if possible. It should double in size.

3. Take out dough and it knock back on a floured surface. This is as simple as patting down the dough, you can’t knead it again as the loose mixture won’t allow it.

4. You can either leave the dough as is or portion it into smaller pieces for ciabatta buns. Let the dough prove on a floured cloth for another 30 to 60 minutes.

5. Pop into a hot oven at 250C for about 15 minutes or so. Declan said not to get too worried about time, and just go with your gut “When it’s done, it’s done”. It will be done when it sounds hollow when you tap it. You can always make a batch and freeze some smaller individual portions when baked for use when you need.

Ciabatta After First Prove Ready To Portion
Ciabatta After First Prove Ready To Portion
Portioned Ciabatta Ready For Second Prove
Portioned Ciabatta Ready For Second Prove
Yes We May Have Started Eating Them Straight Away...
Yes We May Have Started Eating Them Straight Away…
My Attempt At Home
My Attempt At Home
My Ciabattas
My Ciabattas
Nice And Holey On The Inside
Nice And Holey On The Inside
Worth It For The Smug I Made It Myself Factor
Worth It For The Smug I Made It Myself Factor

Fig & Walnut Rye Bread

My Beautiful Fig & Walnut Rye
My Beautiful Fig & Walnut Rye
Here's Something We Prepared Earlier!
Here’s Something We Prepared Earlier!

You may have seen my last blog post about the Sourdough I made in Firehouse Bakery & Bread School last weekend. Well while between the 6 of us we made 24 types of bread and a few cakes, I now have an abundance of bread recipes to keep my inspired, but I felt this particular recipe I had to share too. Rye is probably my favourite bread (along with my mother’s brown soda of course), and I was quite keen to learn how to make a nice rye. I find they can often be dense like a block of concrete when you buy them in bakeries, and so I was looking for the perfect light, moist rye bread. While this isn’t a 100% rye bread, it’s really nice and full of flavour and bite thanks to the figs and walnuts. It’s lovely and moist and perfect with some soft goats cheese. I enjoyed mine with a round of soft Ardsallagh goats cheese and cranberry roulade.

In my last blog post you can see how our day in Firehouse started off, and in this one how it ended. After a great day of learning, a bit of craic and lots of eating we all sat down together to enjoy a delicious meal of quiche, breads, salads, cheeses, meats and wine which Laura had prepared, and had a chat about our day. We finished off with a sampling (feast) of the cakes we had made that afternoon. After lunch we divided up the bread we had made, (and when they say you can leave with as much bread as you can carry they mean it, we had about three bags of bread each!), and set off back on the boat to the mainland just as the sun was setting!

A Hard Day's Work Rewarded With A Delicious Feast
A Hard Day’s Work Rewarded With A Delicious Feast

We had such a great day in Firehouse and learnt so much, I’d highly recommend the course to anyone with an interest in food. It caters to all level, so really don’t be intimidated! It has demystified bread for me, and I’ll definitely be making a loaf this weekend! For now, enjoy Patrick’s recipe for his Walnut & Fig Rye bread below, and let me know what you think!

Leaving Heir Island
Leaving Heir Island
Getting The Ferry Back to Cunnamore Pier
Getting The Ferry Back to Cunnamore Pier

Sponge:

350ml water

200g rye flour

10g fresh yeast or 5g dry yeast (not the fast acting kind)

Dough:

300g strong white flour

10g salt

1 tbsp honey

50g walnutes

75g figs chopped

1. In a clean bowl combine the water, flour, and yeast for the sponge. Mix the ingredients together to form a thick batter consistency. Set to one side and leave to stand for about 30 minutes. The mixture should rise and then collapse. A sponge allows the yeast to get to work without the presence of salt. A sponge helps give your dough a bigger lift and is particularly useful when using doughs that have a lot of weight to carry.

2. To form the dough, combine the flour and salt together and add the sponge and honey. Combine all the ingredients to form a rough dough. Turn out onto a clean work surface and knead for approximately 10 minutes until the windowpane effect has been achieved (When you hold a piece of dough up it supports its own weight and the dough appears translucent as the weight pulls it downwards, instead of ripping and falling apart.) Once the windowpane effect has been achieved add the walnuts and figs to the dough and knead for one or two minutes until the walnuts and figs have been evenly distributed. (Patrick added a dash of water to my dough when I added the nuts and figs, to keep the moisture that the figs might drink out of the dough.)

3. Place the dough in a clean oiled bowl, cover with a damp cloth and allow to prove for 60-90 minutes or until the dough has doubled in size. Turn the dough out on to a clean work surface and knock back the dough, allow it to prove again for a further 60 minutes. It’s ready to bake when pushed lightly with your finger, it quickly springs back.

4. Pre-heat the oven to 230C/ Gas7 and place a roasting tray in the bottom of the oven. Place the dough into the preheated oven and pour a boiling kettlle of water into the seperate preheated roasting tray to release steam into the oven. Bake for 30-35 minutes. Check on the dough after 12 minutes, if the dough is colouring to quickly (due to the honey in the dough) reduce the oven temperature to 200C and continue to bake.

5. Enjoy!

My Sponge
My Sponge
Mix Together My Dough
Mix Together My Dough
Let Prove Longer
Let Prove Longer
My Beautiful Fig & Walnut Rye
My Beautiful Fig & Walnut Rye
A Moist, Fruity, Nutty Inside
A Moist, Fruity, Nutty Inside

Sourdough Bread

My Sourdough
My Sourdough
All Our Sourdoughs
All Our Sourdoughs

I have been hearing a lot about Firehouse Bread, the bread school run by Patrick Ryan, in the last few months, and have been following their tweets filled with pictures of delicious breads, and pictures of Heir Island where they are set up. It seemed really cool, different and good craic so for Christmas I got my boyfriend and I a voucher to do the course, and last weekend we trotted down to West Cork for the ultimate bread making experience. The day started on Cunnamore Pier where we got the boat across to Heir Island and were greeted by Laura who runs Firehouse with Patrick, she drove us to Firehouse, a stunning house overlooking Roaringwater Bay. Here she brought us into their front room for tea, coffee, and some freshly baked biscuits before we got started. There were 6 of us on the course and we all quickly got chatting.

Arriving at Heir Island
Arriving at Heir Island
We Were Greeted With Tea and Homemade Biscuits
We Were Greeted With Tea and Homemade Biscuits

After Patrick introduced himself we were led into the “class room” for lack of a better word, where we immediately started on our sourdough, the first bread of the day. It was actually quite therapeutic kneading away at the sourdough if a little tiring! Sourdough is made with a “starter” and apparently the older the better. Making starter is easy but takes a while, and you feed it like a plant to keep it living, each time you make a sourdough you take a portion of your starter for the bread, and replenish the remaining starter with more water and flour for the next time you make bread. And so the cycle continues! Patricks starter was 4 years old, and apparently the older it gets, the better it tastes. (I can vouch for this, our bread tasted amazing!)

Some of the Treats We Baked Throughout The Day
Some of the Treats We Baked Throughout The Day

Sourdough is time consuming as it takes time to prove, the knock back, then prove again. However it tastes delicious, makes the best sandwiches and toast in the world, and freezes quite well. I’m sure if you get into the habit of making it though, it becomes routine. It’s also worth it for the smug “Oh I made this myself” boasts as you eat your lunchtime sandwich. It’s a great one to make on a Sunday to keep you going through the week. In fact Laura said that when the sourdough is 3 days old it’s perfect sliced, grilled and lightly oiled for bruschetta bread.  Check out Patrick’s recipe below for the perfect sourdough bread!

To Make Your Starter:

Day 1: Heat 175ml milk gently. Place 75ml natual yoghurt in a bowl and stir in the milk. Cover and leave in a warm place for 12 to 24 hours until thickened. Stir in any liquids that may have seperated.

Day 2: Stir 120g white flour into the yoghurt, incorporating evenly. Cover and leave in a warm place for 2 days. The mixture should be full of bubbles and smell pleasantly sour.

Day 5: Add 175g flour to the starter, and mix in 40ml milk and 100ml water. Cover and leave in a warm place for 12 to 24 hours.

Day 6: The starter should be quiet active now and be full of little bubbles. Now you can get cracking and see how many years you can keep your starter going for, some families have the same starter for generations!

White Sourdough Recipe:

500g strong unbleached white bread flour

300g sourdough starter

250ml water

10g salt

10g brown sugar

1. Mix together the flour, starter and water in a bowl. Add the salt and sugar. Turn out on to a clean kitchen surface and knead for 10 minutes or until the windowpane effect is achieved. (This basically means when you hold up a piece of the dough it supports it’s own weight and rather than tearing and falling away, it holds it self up creating a  translucent effect rather than tearing).

2. Put into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a damp tea towel and let it prove for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. You won’t notice as much as a rise in the dough as you would with a normal yeast bread, it takes much longer.

3. Turn out the dough on to a clean surface and knock back (just kneading again), shape into whatever shape fits your proving bowl (bread tin will work). Flour generously and place each loaf seam side up in a bowl, lined with a couch cloth (a heavily floured tea towel will work fine), this helps you turn out the loaf. Leave prove for a further 2 1/2 hours.

4. This dough can be made the day before, allowing the fermentation process to be extended further. Once rolled place the dough into the fridge and leave overnight. Remove 1 1/2 hours before baking

5. Pre-heat the oven to 230C/ Gas7 and place a baking tray with some water or ice cubes in it in the bottom of the oven to steam the oven. Turn the loaf out on to another baking tray. Flour and score the loaf and put in in to the oven. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until a good crust has formed and the loaves sounds hollow when tapped on the base.

After First Prove
After First Prove
Let Prove
Let Prove A Second Time
The Bread is After Proving For a Few Hours
The Bread is After Proving For a Few Hours and Is Ready For Oven
Into The Oven Go Our Little Babies...
Into The Oven Go Our Little Babies…
My Sourdough
My Sourdough
Very Proud Of My Sourdough
Very Proud Of My Sourdough

Enjoy your delicious bread with some cheeses, tapenade and salads like we did! In front of the fire with our feet up!

Our Bread Feast At Home That Evening
Our Bread Feast At Home That Evening

Spelt Bread

Quick and Easy Wholemeal Spelt Bread
Quick and Easy Wholemeal Spelt Bread
Wholemeal Spelt Bread
Wholemeal Spelt Bread

Yesterday I started my January kick-start! Bye-bye mince pies (sniff sniff), goodbye boxes of Leonidas chocolates, wheels of cheese and general piggery. I did a big shop to restock my cupboard and decided to make a spelt bread to keep me going for the week.

My cousin gave me a book  called The Guilt Free Gourmet for Christmas and it’s written by Jordan and Jessica Bourke, a brother and sister duo from Dublin and all of the recipes are wheat, sugar and dairy free. Most of these “healthy” books tend to have rubbish recipes, but this one is great. Jordon is trained in Ballymaloe and worked in a Michelen star restaurant and Jessica is a nutritionist  who makes sure all the delicious recipes pass the healthy test. I recommend it for anyone looking for a healthy but really tasty recipe book.

They had a recipe for Spelt bread which I tried, and honestly its the nicest Spelt bread I have ever eaten. It’s ridiculously easy to make, and packed with seeds and other good stuff. The recipe says to put in raisins, which were great in it, but I generally leave them out if I’m planning on using the loaf for sandwiches etc. Spelt still has gluten in it, but it’s much better for you than other breads. It’s easier to digest and higher in protein. This bread is well worth trying, I munched mine hot from the oven with smokey red pepper hummus… delicious!

Spelt Bread - Moist, Filling, Healthy and Delicious
Spelt Bread – Moist, Filling, Healthy and Delicious

Ingredients (Makes one loaf):

475g Wholemeal spelt Flour

1 tsp bread soda

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp sea salt

150g mixed seeds (optional- I sprinkled mine on top instead of putting them in the mix)

50g raisins (optional)

550ml tepid water

1 tbsp blackstrap molasses

1. Mix all dry ingredients together

2. Stir the molasses in to the water, and then mix the wet ingredients into dry ingredients.

3. Immediately pour into a greased and lined bread tin (20cm/8 inch loaf tin), and pop into a preheated oven at 180C for 45 to 60 minutes. It’s done when brown on top and a skewer comes out clean.

4. Take out of tin and let cool on it’s back. (If you put it straight into a tupperware or bread bin the steam from the heat can make the crust soft, so let it cool first)

Mix Together All Ingredients
Mix Together All Ingredients
Pour The Spelt Bread Mix Into A Lined Bread Tin
Pour The Spelt Bread Mix Into A Lined Bread Tin
Spelt Bread Hot From The Oven
Spelt Bread Hot From The Oven