Category Archives: Breads

Nutty Chocolate and Cranberry Spotted Puppies

When it comes to the simple pleasures in life, there are few things I love more than buttered bread hot from the oven, cake and chocolate. Thankfully this recipe is an amalgamation of all of those things! I’m a total bread fiend (hence working for free in a bakery last year) and have already waxed lyrical about my love of Spotted Dog when I made it earlier this year here. These Spotted Puppies are mini versions, like little scones, of the popular and traditional Irish Spotted Dog.

Butter Is Good For The Soul, Especially When Eaten On Top Of These Bad Boys
Butter Is Good For The Soul, Especially When Eaten On Top Of These Bad Boys

The Spotted Dog is basically a slightly sweet and fruity soda bread. I decided to pimp these puppies out with dried cranberries, chopped walnuts and dark chocolate chips. Sorry to be boastful, but they were incredible. Make sure to eat them hot from the oven slathered in salted butter… Delicious!

Buttery Little Bundles Of Chocolate, Cranberry and Walnut Glory
Buttery Little Bundles Of Chocolate, Cranberry and Walnut Glory
Warm From The Oven With The Chocolate Still Gooey
Warm From The Oven With The Chocolate Still Gooey

Ingredients:

450g plain/cream flour

1 tsp bread soda (bicarb of soda)

1 tsp salt

1 tbsp sugar

350ml buttermilk

1 egg

100g dark choc chips (I just chopped a bar into little chunks)

100g cranberries

75g chopped walnuts

  1. Preheat your oven to 220C. Sieve the flour into a bowl (I actually never sieve it because I am lazy, but it helps get more air into the mix), stir in the salt, sugar,  walnuts, chocolate and cranberries. Make a well in the centre of the mix.
  2. Your wet mix (buttermilk and egg) should make 400ml, to be safe pop your egg into the measuring jug and then add the buttermilk until you hit the 400ml mark. Give it a quick whisk.
  3. Pour the wet mix into the dry mix and start bringing it together by using your hand (stiff like a claw) to bring the dry mix into the centre. Keep doing this until just combined. The most important thing with this, or any soda bread, is not to overmix it or it will become tough.
  4. When just combined divide the mix into six portions and pop it onto an oiled tray. Put into the oven immediately, again if you leave it out before putting it in the oven it will loose it’s lightness.
  5. After the first 5 minutes you can turn the heat down to 200C, then let them bake for another 15 minutes.
  6. When cooked slice open and butter with generous helpings of salted butter immediately! No need for jam. it will just mask the flavours of your beautiful fillings.
  7. Enjoy!
Stir Your Buttermilk Into A Well Into Your Beautiful Spotted Dog Mixture
Stir Your Buttermilk Into A Well Into Your Beautiful Spotted Dog Mixture
Your Spotted Dog Mixture Is Ready To Be Turned Into Puppies Once It Has Just Come Together Like So
Your Spotted Dog Mixture Is Ready To Be Turned Into Puppies Once It Has Just Come Together Like So
These Chocolatey Cranberry and Walnut Puppies Are Ready For The Oven
These Chocolatey Cranberry and Walnut Puppies Are Ready For The Oven
Hot From The Oven - Eat These ASAP To Enjoy Maximum Melted Chocolate Pleasure
Hot From The Oven – Eat These ASAP To Enjoy Maximum Melted Chocolate Pleasure
These Chocolate Spotted Puppies Make A Perfect Tea Time Spread
These Chocolate Spotted Puppies Make A Perfect Tea Time Spread

Outrageously Olivey Olive Bread

I have recently been on holidays in Italy (yet again), drawn back by the lure of bread, cheese, pizza, pasta and gelato. I just love holidays in Italy, being able to chill out on a beautiful beach with a book, take breaks for ice-cream (it’s holidays okay…), dip into a seaside restaurant for fresh fish for lunch with a bottle of local wine, more sunbathing, then pre-dinner drinks followed by a big plate of fresh pasta heaped with seafood, butter, herbs and prawns, and more wine, and bread… Lots of bread. Okay I’m getting a little distracted and hungry again just thinking about it.

Beautiful Fresh Salty Olive Bread... Mmmmm!
Beautiful Fresh Salty Olive Bread… Mmmmm!

One of my favourite things to eat there is a Caprese salad with fresh, local buffalo mozzarella, juicy tomatoes and basil mopped up with crusty bread. While I was in Puglia I had some of the most incredible olive breads and decided that I had to make one as soon as I got back. So off to the market I trotted and filled up a bag of salty, black olives. While my bread looks brown it’s actually white, all the kneading of the olives into the dough coloured it. You could always add the olives into the bread after kneading for a dramatic contrast.

This bread is made using fast-action yeast and so is very quick and easy to make. Why not make it this weekend and enjoy it with some fresh mozzarella and a good bottle of red?

Olive Bread Slathered With Hummus Is Beyond Delicious
Olive Bread Slathered With Hummus Is Beyond Delicious
So Good I Bit A Chunk Of It Off Before I Finished Taking Pictures
So Good I Bit A Chunk Of It Off Before I Finished Taking Pictures

 

Ingredients

500g white bread flour

1 large handful black olives chopped

2 tbsp olive oil

1 pinch salt

1 sachet of fast action yeast

300ml warm water

1 heaped teaspoon of brown sugar

  1. In a large bowl mix together the flour, sugar, salt and oil. Give it a quick stir and then stir in the yeast.
  2. Now stir in the water and stir for a minute until all ingredients are combined. You can either add in the olives now, or after kneading so that the bread is less brown in colour.
  3. Knead the bread on a clean, floured surface for at least 10 minutes, or if you have an electric mixer with a dough hook you could throw it in that for half the time.
  4. Shape the dough and coat it with a little olive oil. Pop it into an oiled bowl and cover in cling film. Leave it in a warm place until it has double in size which can take between 1.5 – 2 hours.
  5. When the dough has risen bake in an oven, preheated to 220c for 35-40 minutes. A trick here is to throw a few ice cubs or half a glass of water into the oven 5 minutes before putting the bread in, the steam will help create a nice crust on the bread. I like to slash a blade or sharp knife across the top of the bread too before putting it in the oven to allow the steam to escape.
  6. The baked loaf should sound hollow when tapped underneath. Let the bread cool on a wire rack and enjoy with some butter, cheese or hummus!
Knead The Dough For Ten Minutes
Knead The Dough For Ten Minutes
Leave The Bread To Prove Until Doubled In Size
Leave The Bread To Prove Until Doubled In Size
A Nice Big Chunk Of Fresh Olive Bread Hot From The Oven
A Nice Big Chunk Of Fresh Olive Bread Hot From The Oven
Delicious Soft Salty Olive Bread With Crispy Crust
Delicious Soft Salty Olive Bread With Crispy Crust

Brown Oatmeal Scones

Delicious Brown Oatmeal Scones
Delicious Brown Oatmeal Scones
Brown Scones
Brown Scones
Brown Oatmeal Scones
Brown Oatmeal Scones

Calling all lovers of the humble scone! These brown oatmeal scones are just the thing you need to accompany your cup of tea, or even for a quick breakfast. During my few years living in Dublin I have become well acquainted with the Avoca scones. They are amazing. They come with jam, butter and cream (enough said). While I initially was all about their berry scones, I am now quite obsessed with the brown scones they make. I found the recipe online and decided to give them a go but substitute some of the flour for oats. The result was pretty amazing, they are really nice and wholesome. The outside is all biscuity and crunchy/crispy and the inside is all soft and wholesome. They take hardly any time at all to make, you feel like you’re eating something relatively healthy… Unless you load on the butter and raspberry jam like I do.

I think adding some nuts, seeds and dried fruit would be really nice too, but I thought if I added them in to these they would be a little too similar to my Fruity Seeded Spelt Scones. These are definitely worth giving a go, and adding to your baking repertoire. Now go forth and bake!

Delicious and Nutritious Brown Oatmeal Scones
Delicious and Nutritious Brown Oatmeal Scones
Brown Scones Slathered With Butter and Jam
Brown Scones Slathered With Butter and Jam

Ingredients (makes 10-12 small scones):

350g wholemeal flour (I used Howards coarse wholemeal flour)

100g oats

110g butter cut into cubes

1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

2 tbsp greek yoghurt

75 – 150ml whole milk

1 pinch salt

1 egg beaten

Seeds

  1. Pour the flour, oats and salt in a bowl and rub in the butter until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Running your hands under cold water for a minute first helps prevent the butter from melting.
  2. Mix a well in the centre of the bowl and add in the yoghurt of bicarbonate of soda. Leave to react for a couple of minutes and then add 75ml of the milk and mix well. You may need more or less milk, you just want it to come together. (I used all 150ml milk)
  3. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and pat down until it’s about 2 1/2 cm thick. Cut out into scones with a scones cutter or an upside down glass and transfer onto a buttered baking tray.
  4. Brush with the beaten egg and sprinkle the seeds on top. Pop into an oven preheated to 180C for 15-20 minutes (they took me 16 minutes). Enjoy hot from the oven with butter and jam. When cooled, store in a sealed container. They’re best eaten the day they’re made, but gorgeous a day or two after toasted and buttered.
Mix Youghurt & Bicarb Into Flour and Butter Crumbs
Mix Youghurt & Bicarb Into Flour and Butter Crumbs
Cut Dough Into Circles
Cut Dough Into Circles
Pop Scones Onto A Greased Baking Tray
Pop Scones Onto A Greased Baking Tray
Brown Scones Hot From The Oven
Brown Scones Hot From The Oven
Brown Scones With Oats
Brown Scones With Oats

Spotted Dog

Spotted Dog
Spotted Dog
Delicious Hot From The Oven
Delicious Hot From The Oven
Spotted Dog- Perfect With Butter And Jam
Spotted Dog- Perfect With Butter And Jam

Spotted Dog is a classic traditional Irish comfort food. It’s essentially a slightly sweetened Irish soda bread with raisins running through it, hence the name, Spotted Dog. My Grandad used always make white soda bread, he was great at making it, and never used any measurements. In our house, our soda breads are always brown, with the exception for this loaf which my Dad made once, donkey yonks ago.

My poor pops travelled all the way down to Ballymaloe to pick me up a copy of Darina Allen’s “Ballymaloe Cookery Course” cookbook, which is incredible by the way, it is the perfect tome which contains pretty much any and every classic recipe you could ever need. Anyway while browsing through the cake and bread sections (always my first port of call), I came across Darina’s Spotted Dog recipe and decided to give it a go for old times sake. I followed the recipe exactly with the exception of soaking my sultanas in whisky and orange juice the night before for a bit of extra juiciness.

This is so incredibly easy to make, and so satisfying. My favourite comfort foods come in bread form, hot from the oven and slathered with butter. This is delicious, really soft on the inside with a slight sweetness from the sugar and sultanas, but with a lovely crust on the outside. This is best with butter and jam, but apparently also very nice with cheese. It is also gorgeous toasted with butter when a day or two old.

Comforting and Delicious - Spotted Dog
Comforting and Delicious – Spotted Dog
Soft and Fruity Soda Bread
Soft and Fruity Soda Bread
Irish Soda Bread - Spotted Dog
Irish Soda Bread – Spotted Dog

Ingredients:

450g plain white / cream flour

1 tsp bread soda

1 tsp salt

1 dessert spoon sugar

1 egg

340ml buttermilk

100g sultanas

Splash Whisky (optional)

Splash Orange Juice (optional)

  1. I soaked my sultanas in whisky and orange juice the night before which plumped them out nicely, and gave them a lovely juiciness. This is an optional step, but don’t worry the bread doesn’t taste of whisky, you can barely taste it in the sultanas, but it’s a nice subtle addition.
  2. Sieve the flour and bread soda into a large mixing bowl and add the salt, sugar and fruit. Mix together by lifting the flour and fruit up in your hands and letting them fall back into the bowl through your fingers (this apparently adds more air, making the bread lighter).
  3. Crack the egg into a measuring jug and then add the buttermilk until you reach 400ml (the egg is part of the liquid measurement), so this could be a little more or less than 350ml of buttermilk.
  4. Make a well in the middle of the bowl of flour and pour in the liquids. Mix together using your fingers drawing the flour from the outside of the bowl into the centre until it’s fully combined (the key to a great soda bread is not to over mix the dough). Pop the dough out on to a floured surface, wash your hands and with flours fingers, roll lightly for a few seconds, just to tidy the edges together.
  5. Put the round of dough onto a floured baking tray and pat lightly on top to even it out. Take a sharp knife and cut a deep cross on it, letting the cuts go over the edge. Prick each angle with a knife (according to Irish folklore this lets the fairies out… long story).
  6. Pop into a hot oven preheated to 220C for 10 minutes, then decrease the heat to 200C and bake for a further 35 minutes or until cooked. It is cooked when if tapped on the base it sounds hollow.
  7. Serve warm with lashings of butter and a blob of jam… Perfect.
Soda Dough Once Mixed Together
Soda Dough Once Mixed Together
Floured and Shaped Round of Soda Bread Dough
Floured and Shaped Round of Soda Bread Dough
Cut A Cross In Your Dough To Let Out The Fairies
Cut A Cross In Your Dough To Let Out The Fairies
Spotted Soda Bread Hot From The Oven
Spotted Soda Bread Hot From The Oven
Butter This Bad Boy Up
Butter This Bad Boy Up

Irish Brown Dillisk Scones

Delicious Brown Dillisk Soda Scones
Delicious Brown Dillisk Soda Scones
Beautiful Brown Dillisk Soda Scones
Beautiful Brown Dillisk Soda Scones
The Perfect Lunch
The Perfect Lunch

This recipe came about as a result of a craving for brown soda scones and a bag of dried dillisk (dried Irish seasweed) in my press waiting to be used up! I had totally forgot about it until I recently read that John and Sally McKenna had released a book about cooking with seaweed (or sea vegetables as the more posh folk would say), and it reminded me that I had a bag to us up, so in it went to my last batch of brown soda scones. Seaweed of all different varieties adorn the Irish shores, and yet Irish people don’t eat it nearly as much as you would think despite it being such a nutritous food. However, seaweeds are becoming very fashionable again and I’m starting to sea a whole number of varieties on menus again. Seaweed has been used as a beauty treatment in Ireland for centuries, and many Irish cosmetic companies use it as their superstar ingredient, Voya being by far the best Irish luxury cosmetic company, harnessing seaweeds hydrating properties. So here’s to using what we have in plenty and finding fun and unusual ways of cooking and eating it.

I also have to mention Macroom Oats and Flours as I used them in this recipe, and I use their grains all the time. The Macroom mill is based in Cork and is run by a man called Donal Creedon. I haven’t met him, but he’s known in Cork as being a true artisan who has managed to make oats and flour a luxury artisan product. His oats are stoneground and lightly toasted and make the most delicious, luxurious porridge in the world. His wholemeal flour is ground in the same way and gives the most lovely slightly nutty texture to breads. I recommend seeking the products out, they’re available in most good independent delis and health shops around the country, but often times if they’re not you can just enquire at your local speciality store and they’re usually quite open to ordering unavailable products in.

These scones are savoury using the dillisk which has a lovely very slightly salty taste and beautiful texture, and a little parmasan cheese to give the scones a subtle kick. When they are fresh out of the oven the taste of the dilisk is stronger (the heat and moisture rehydrates the dried dillisk), however when cooled the taste is extremely subtle. However, these would be perfectly delicious without the dillisk or cheese, and the recipe can be used in exactly the same way and would be gorgeous topped with a little jam and cream.

Delicious Irish Ingredients
Delicious Irish Ingredients
Dried Dillisk
Dried Dillisk

Ingredients (makes 6-8):

225g self raising flour

180g coarse wholemeal flour

20g oats (if you don’t have any oats you can just use 20g wholemeal flour)

1 tsp bread soda

1 pinch salt

75g butter room temperature

2 tbsp grated Parmasen cheese (or any other cheese)

2 handfuls of dillisk (or other dried seaweed) chopped

300ml buttermilk

2 eggs

2 tbsp mixed seeds to scatter on top (optional)

  1. Preheat the oven to 220C and mix the flours, bread soda, salt, cheese and dillisk into a bowl.
  2. Rub the butter into the flour mixture until combined in.
  3. Mix together one of the eggs and the buttermilk and milk into the flour with your hand until the mixture is combined.
  4. Turn out onto a floured surface. This is a loose, wet mix, so spoon some mixture out trying to keep height of about 2-3cm height. (If you prefer a more structured scone that is less loose, then use 100ml less buttermilk, then you should be able to turn out your dough and use a scone cutter). There is a beautiful moist softness to the recipe above though, so I recommend doing it my way.
  5. Pop the scones into a tin on top of a greased piece of baking paper, you can use a little of the second beaten egg to wash the top of the scones and sprinkle the seeds on top.
  6. Bake for about 10-15 minutes, they are done when they are golden on top.
  7. Let cool completely on a wire wrack before serving.
Macroom Stoneground Wholemeal Flour
Macroom Stoneground Wholemeal Flour
Portion Out Dough
Portion Out Dough
Ready For The Oven
Ready For The Oven
Brown Scones Hot From The Oven
Brown Scones Hot From The Oven
Delicious Buttered Brown Soda Scones
Delicious Buttered Brown Soda Scones

Blackberry and Basil Homemade Bagels

My Delicious Blackberry and Basil Homemade Bagels
My Delicious Blackberry and Basil Homemade Bagels
The Perfect Bagel Brunch
The Perfect Bagel Brunch
My Blackberry and Basil Bagel
My Blackberry and Basil Bagel
My Brunch of Homemade Poppyseed Bagels
My Brunch of Homemade Poppyseed Bagels

Every now and then I get a notion to make something I’ve never made before. I think I must have had bagels on my mind after my trip to New York last month, bagels with creamy cheese, smoked salmon, tomatoes and capers for breakfast was a particular treat on my last morning in NYC. However, back in Ireland, you just can’t get really good bagels in many places, which is probably why I was never too bothered by them before. The only ones available in most supermarkets are a bready excuse for a bagel that would make most New Yorkers shudder. However my recent trip to New York wooed me and since then I have had them on the brain.

With the weather being so amazing at the moment (to non-Irish readers, this means actually being able to sunbath and swim in July… a rare occurrence) I decided to make an outdoors brunch for my parents the last time I was home. There is nothing nicer than taking the time to have a nice breakfast, especially when it can be enjoyed outside in the sun. Coffee and Tea, fresh bagels, fruit and the Sunday newspaper al fresco… It’s hard not to relax in such a situation.

I make bread a lot at home, so I figured that bagels couldn’t be much harder to make. They actually were pretty easy to make, and a lot of fun too, the process of boiling them into a spongy ring before baking them was pretty cool. My only advice would be to double the quantities below as they make seven, and they will all be eaten straight away if your family is like mine. It’s worth making a second batch, slicing and freezing them for a quick morning breakfast as if you go to the effort of making these, you should really get more than one morning out of them. These were my favourite bake in months, so I hope you enjoy them as much as I did. I thought blackberry and basil with thick cream cheese would be an unusual but delicious topping, and it really worked out great. If you have any other unusual bagel toppings though, I would love to hear them as I plan on making them again soon!

Bagels Hot From The Oven
Bagels Hot From The Oven

Ingredients (The standard bagel recipe used is a Rachel Allen recipe):

450g/ 1lb strong white bread flour (used a French T65 flour)

250ml warm water

1 x 7g fast acting yeast sachet

2 level tsp salt

2 tbsp honey

1 tbsp vegetable oil

3 tbsp treacle or molasses (I didn’t have either so used honey… worked perfectly)

1 beaten egg

1/2 cup poppy seeds

1 tub full-fat cream cheese

2 punnets of blackberries

1 bunch of basil leaves

  1. Sift together the flour, salt and mix in the yeast in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Stir the honey and oil into the warm water. Make a well in the flour and pour in the wet mixture and mix together with your hands. When it has come together, pop it out onto a clean floured surface and knead for 10 to 15 minutes. (This dough is tough and stiff, so if you’re used to make your own breads you may worry that the dough is quite tense/tough… but this is totally normal.)
  3. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, toss it around in it to coat lightly in oil, cover with cling film and let to prove for 1 to 3 hours. I only had an hour as I was under time pressure, but it tasted fantastic. However the usual rule is the longer you prove the better it tastes. Also be careful not to oil the bowl and bread too much as it will be very difficult to shape afterwards.
  4. After proving knock back the bread and portion into 7 equally sized piece. Shape into a ball, stick you finger through the centre creating a ring. Set aside to prove for 20 more minutes.
  5. Bring a large pot of water to the boil, add the 3 tbsp treacle or honey and then let it come down to a simmer. Pop in two or three bagels at a time (depending on size) for 2 minutes and then flip them onto their other sides and boil for two more minutes. Then take them out and let them drain on a wire rack. Continue this step for all your bagels.
  6. Coat the top of the bagel in egg wash and sprinkle generously with poppy seeds. Place all the bagels onto a well oiled tin, spaced far apart (I used two trays for my 7 bagels). Put into an oven at 220C for 15 minutes, then take them out and flip them over to cook the bases, I egg washed and sprinkled my bases with poppy seeds again, and then pop back into the oven for 10 more minutes. Let cool on a wire rack for a few minutes before serving.
  7. Slice in half and smear the bagel with cream cheese, press in some black berries and basil leaves and serve immediately while still warm.
Bagels Boiling Away Nicely
Bagels Boiling Away Nicely
Boiled Bagel
Boiled Bagel
Seeded and Ready For The Oven
Seeded and Ready For The Oven
Homemade Poppyseed Bagel Hot From Oven
Homemade Poppyseed Bagel Hot From Oven
My Homemade Bagels
My Homemade Bagels
Delicious Flavour Combination of Blackberry and Basil
Delicious Flavour Combination of Blackberry and Basil
Brunch is Served
Brunch is Served

Brown Soda Bread

Brown Soda Bread
Brown Soda Bread
Irish Brown Soda Bread
Irish Brown Soda Bread

Last night was my last night of the Arbutus Bread Course 😦 And I have to say despite having to travel down to Cork from Dublin late Tuesday night every week and getting the 5am bus back to Dublin every Thursday morning, I am quite sorry to see it end. In fact the 5am bus ride was almost enjoyable when it was accompanied with a little flask of hot tea and a some of the fresh bread (generously buttered and slathered with jam) that I had made the night before at Arbutus!

This week was great as two of the breads we did, Latvian Rye and Brown Soda, would be the breads I would eat the most on a day to day basis. The Latvian Rye would be the bread I would buy from Arbutus the most, and luckily we had the pleasure of learning to make it from Ivers, the baker responsible for this loaf being on the Arbutus shelves. He also refers to it as sweet and sour rye bread, it has a really distinct flavour from the sugar, salt, and carraway seeds that they add to the mix. It is delicious.

The second bread we did was the classic Irish Brown Soda Bread. This is probably the quickest and easiest bread anyone can make, and every Irish family seems to have their own variation. However, the Arbutus brown was so good I will have to ditch my usual recipe and make this one going forward. It’s so soft and flavoursome, with the most amazing thick crust on the outside. What is even better is that there is no kneading, proving and knocking back involved so if you’re new to bread making, this is the recipe for you. Apparently the taste varies depending on whether you make it in the crossed cake shape (like pictured) or in a tin, with the round cake shape being preferable. This is the bread that cheered me up at 5am yesterday morning with a nice spoon of Flynn’s Kitchen raspberry jam on the long road back to Dublin.

Ingredients (For 2 loaves):

1 kg of course brown flour (Howards One Way or Odlums work well)

360g White Flour

25g Bread Soda

25g Cream of Tartar

20g Salt

75g Macroom Oatmeal (Or other stoneground or steel cut oatmeal)

1.5 litre Buttermilk (a little soured if possible)

50ml Sour Cream

50ml Oil

1 Egg

Few handfuls of Extra Course Brown Flour for coating the loaf (Howards Extra Strong)

1. Mix all the dry ingredients together apart from the oats. Mix these together well by fluffing the ingredients up from underneath (this also adds some air into the mix and takes away the density of the loaf.)

2. Mix all the wet ingredients and add the oats to soften out for about 20 to 30 minutes. Mix the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix together well, again by fluffing the ingredients up with your hands.

3. Sprinkle your work surface with the extra coarse flour and place the dough on top, shape into a round with your hand and carefully flip it upside down to coat the other side (it’s a very soft wet dough, so be careful not to put your hand through it.

4. When your dough it nicely coated with the coarse flour let it sit for 10 minutes, then cut a cross on top and pop into an oven heated to 240C for about 40 minutes. When it’s done it should have a hollow sounds when tapped on the bottom, also when you press down on the top the bread should hold its shape and not sink down.

5. Enjoy this with pretty much anything! I love a piece hot from the oven with butter and jam, but it’s also perfect with soups and for sandwiches.

Mix Together Wet And Dry Ingredients
Mix Together Wet And Dry Ingredients
Shape Into A Round
Shape Into A Round
Ready For The Oven
Ready For The Oven
Out They Come
Out They Come
Delicious Brown Soda Bread
Delicious Brown Soda Bread