Turkish Pide Bread

Turkish Pide Bread
Turkish Pide Bread
Sukru Showing Us How To Make His Famous Pide Bread
Sukru Showing Us How To Make His Famous Pide Bread

Another week, another night in Arbutus Breads learning all their secrets to the tastiest breads in Ireland! This week we made two breads that were definitely my favourites so far. We made a Turkish Pide bread, and also a Saffron & Almond sweet bread (will blog this later). These were both so good that I ate both loaves in their entirety on my own over the following two days.. I know, I’m a greedy guts!

The Turkish Pide was absolutely delicious. We were taught how to make this bread from Sukru, a third generation Turkish baker that has worked at Arbutus for over ten years. This guy is amazing… he was kneading dough two at a time.. one in each hand!

This recipe makes three loaves and is perfect for tear and share, great for parties with dips. The Turks often stuff these as well. I think I will try stuffing one of mine with a minced lamb mixture and drizzle it with mint yoghurt. They are also great toasted with cheese and other treats in the centre.

Apparently this delicious bread is traditionally eaten at the end of Ramadan sprinkled with sesame and sweet onion seeds. Bakers from outside of Istanbul travel to the capital for the month and earn three times their usual salary to supply the demand! People will queue for hours to make sure that they get a loaf. Honestly, I can’t imagine a better way to break a fast than with a torn piece of this delicious flat bread.

Delicious Turkish Pide Bread
Delicious Turkish Pide Bread

Ingredients (3 loaves):

1 kilo white bread flour

100g fresh yeast if proving for just 1 hour (You only need 50g fresh yeast if proving for three hours which is preferable)

50g butter melted (or 100g melted butter if you don’t use the sourdough starter listed below)

50g sourdough starter

500g fresh whole milk

18g salt (add at end of mixing)

1. Mix all ingredients in a food mixer (or bowl if working by hand) for four minutes on a low speed and then four minutes on a high speed. If mixing and kneading by hand, knead gently for about 10 to 15 minutes until it all comes together.

2. Leave it to rest for 1 hour in a bowl covered with a towel before cutting and shaping. After resting, cut the dough into three equal pieces. Knead very lightly of a minute or two using the palm of your hand until the dough comes together to form a nice little ball. Leave rest for another 10 minutes.

3. On a lightly floured surface flatten the dough with your outstretched fingers until you have a nice disk shape. Then make the pattern on the bread by using your fingers to imprint four lines vertically and horizontally on the loaf. Then join up these lines to create a circular rim. Look at the photos below for guidance. Place the bread over the backs of your hands and give it a little spin (you will feel very cool doing this) like you see people doing in pizzerias.

4. Sprinkle with sesame and sweet onion (or nigella) seeds. You can get these in health shops and they make such a difference, they’re really fragrant and delicious. Mist the dough lightly with a little water.  Place in a hot oven preheated to around 220C for about 10 minutes or so, you want it lightly golden on top, but not too crusty as this is meant to be a light soft bread.

Soft Springy Dough
Soft Springy Dough
Portion Up The Dough
Portion Up The Dough
Knead The Dough Lightly
Knead The Dough Lightly
Flatten Out The Dough Into A Disc Shape
Flatten Out The Dough Into A Disc Shape
Make Your Indentations In The Dough
Make Your Indentations In The Dough
Shaped and Patterned Dough
Shaped and Patterned Dough
Sprinkle With Sesame and Sweet Onion Seeds
Sprinkle With Sesame and Sweet Onion Seeds
Pide Is Ready For The Oven
Pide Is Ready For The Oven
Spray With Water and Throw In Oven
Spray With Water and Throw In Oven
Pide Hot From The Oven
Pide Hot From The Oven
Let Cool On A Wire Rack
Let Cool On A Wire Rack

Hot Cross Buns

Delicious Buttery Hot Cross Buns
Delicious Buttery Hot Cross Buns
Hot Cross Buns
Hot Cross Buns
Beautiful Hot Cross Buns
Beautiful Hot Cross Buns

There are some foods that I haven’t eaten in years, but every time I revisit them they totally bring me back to memories of when I was younger. Hot Cross Buns are one of them. Around Easter time every year, I would come home from school and find my Mum had bought a few hot cross buns which we would toast and slather in butter and jam. Those spicy hot cross buns were so comforting and such a nice treat to come home to.

While experimenting (and failing) with a few breads last night, I decided to give some hot cross buns a go and thankfully they turned out perfectly! These are actually quite easy to make, but as they use yeast you do have to wait for them to prove twice. Still that’s no big deal if you’re at home for the evening. They made the perfect late night snack.

For the crosses just mix some white flour and water and roll out into a spaghetti size piece and press into the buns. The more flour you use though, they harder your crosses will be, so try keep them as liquid as possible to avoid your teeth breaking off when you bite into them.  (Note- this particular time I used more of a paste and the crosses pretty much disappeared while baking so I outlined them in icing sugar once baked… So make sure to make the spaghetti style pieces for the crosses!) For the sticky glaze on top of the Hot Cross Buns, I used some Llewellyn’s Irish Apple Syrup which was delicious. I picked up a bottle in the Dun Laoighre market at the weekend, and their stuff was amazing. However you could use honey, maple syrup, melted marmelade etc.

I hope you enjoy these buns, and they take you back through memory lane as well.

Delicious Hot Cross Buns - Perfect with Butter and Honey or Jam
Delicious Hot Cross Buns – Perfect with Butter and Honey or Jam

Ingredients:

450g Bread Flour

Pinch Salt

1 tsp mixed spice

1 tsp ground ginger

1 tsp nutmeg

1/2 tsp cinnamon

100g butter (melted)

7g fast acting dried yeast

25g light brown sugar

2 eggs

225ml warm whole milk

150g raisins (I used some chopped dried apricots too for colour)

Orange zest

Apple syrup/honey to glaze

1. Mix together the flour, salt, spices, brown sugar, spices, raisins and orange zest in a bowl.

2. Add a teaspoon of sugar to the warm milk and add the dried yeast, stir together and leave sit for five minutes. Add the yeast milk mixture, the melted butter and one of the beaten eggs to the flour mix, and mix together until it forms a dough.

3. Place the dough out on a floured surface and knead lightly for about 10 minutes. Then cover lightly with sunflower oil, place in a bowl and cover in cling film. Leave it for an hour to prove and it should almost double in size.

4. Knock back the dough (very lightly knead again for a minute) and portion into 10 to 12 pieces. Mix together some white flour and water and form little spaghetti like pieces of dough and squish into the buns in a cross shape. Brush the buns with the remaining beaten egg and leave in a warm place to prove again for about 30 minutes.

5. Pop into an over heated to about 200C for 15 to 20 minutes. When they’re done take them out and brush lightly with your apple syrup (or other chosen sticky stuff). Enjoy hot with plenty of butter and jam! They’re great the next day toasted too.. Hot Cross Buns must be served hot after all!

Mix Wet and Dry Ingredients
Mix Wet and Dry Ingredients
Mix Ingredients Into a Dough and Knead
Mix Ingredients Into a Dough and Knead
Let Dough Prove
Let Dough Prove
Hot Cross Buns - The Perfect Easter Treat
Hot Cross Buns – The Perfect Easter Treat

Brown Yeast Bread

Brown Yeast Bread
Brown Yeast Bread

I have just finished my second class of the 4 week Arbutus Bread Course and I am really enjoying it, so much so that I’m already disappointed that I’m half way through the course. I want to keep going there every week to eat and learn about bread forever! Its so much fun to go every week to listen and learn from Declan Ryan about the art of making artisan bread. You can see how passionate he is about break making as his face literally lights up when he talks about it and his past experiences in different bakeries across the world.

This week we learnt how to make Sourdough and Brown Yeast Bread. Their Brown Yeast Bread is really amazing and totally unlike any other brown bread you will have tried. Its really moist, have a bit of a chew and is  not dense like traditional brown sodas. It also has the most amazing sesame seed crust… delicious! It also only requires one prove and so is probably the speediest yeast bread you can make.

There is a funny history behind this particular loaf, and it seems there is a bit of a debate as to who has the naming rights to it! It was invented by Doris Grant, the wife of a cardiologist who was striving to make a delicious, healthy, fibre filled bread and so is it is also known as a Grant Loaf. However in Ireland it is often referred to as “Ballymaloe Bread”. Myrtle Allen founder of Ballymaloe House was taught this recipe by Stephen Pearce’s (the Irish potter) mother many years ago, and it has become a Ballymaloe staple and so now is known as Ballymaloe Bread in Ireland. Isn’t it interesting to know all the history behind this humble loaf?

I also left the course this week with a mighty goody bag from Arbutus including a pot of their starter, some fresh yeast and French T65 flour. I am totally equipped to recreate this  at home this weekend, and a good friend has volunteered to be my guinea pig. I hope that I manage to recreate it well, but honestly I am more worried about killing the pot of Arbutus starter Declan gave me… It’s almost 20 years old and delicious! Keeping a starter has been compared to keeping a pet, and my track record with pets isn’t great, so here’s hoping my starter has a long healthy life!

Learning A Few Extra Tricks
Learning A Few Extra Tricks

Ingredients:

300g Wholemeal flour (Try Macroom Wholewheat Stoneground)
150g of white flour
9g salt
360ml water at 40C
7g fresh yeast (or 3g dry yeast)
9g Malt extract or Molasses (You can use honey if stuck but you won’t get the nice brown colour)
Sourdough Starter (around 100ml or a handful click here for recipe of how to make sourdough starter)

1. Dissolve yeast and malt extract in the warm water.
2. Place flour and salt in a bowl making a well in the centre and gradually add the water mixture. Using your hands combine all the ingredients into a dough (which will seem quite wet and very squidgy but this is normal!)
3. Place the dough in a well oiled baking LB tin, cover with a sprinkle of flour and leave it to rise for about an hour at room temperature.
4. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas Mark 6, bake for 30-40 minutes. The bread should sound hollow when tapped on the base if fully cooked. Return to the oven out of the tin for 5/10 minutes to crisp up the sides and base. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

After Mixing Pop Into Oiled Tins
After Mixing Pop Into Oiled Tins
Leave To Prove
Leave To Prove
Ready For The Oven
Ready For The Oven
In They Go
In They Go
Our Beauties Hot From The Oven
Our Beauties Hot From The Oven
Perfect
Perfect

Smoked Haddock & Fennel Fish Pie

Smoked Haddock and Fennel Fish Pie
Smoked Haddock and Fennel Fish Pie
Eat Me It Cries!
Eat Me It Cries!
Can't Beat Home Made Fish Pie
Can’t Beat Home Made Fish Pie

I made Fish Pie for the first time this weekend and I must admit, I was quite impressed with myself! I had a craving for some comforting, hearty fish pie during the week and so set about making some on Saturday night. I noticed everyone was blogging pictures of green food this weekend and Irish traditional dishes for Paddy’s Day, which I didn’t do at all. But I think this Fish Pie still fits the traditional Irish food bill, so I’m going to pretend that this was my patriotic offering this Paddy’s Weekend.

I wanted to use some fennel and lemon juice in my fish pie for a nice refreshing flavour and so stuck to white fish only, as I felt the flavours would complement each other. I picked up a nice fillet of smoked haddock and also of monkfish and they worked beautifully. No proper fish pie would ever leave out the smoked fish, you need the smokiness to cut through the creamy sauce. I think that simple, comforting meals like this are the best, all you need to do it make sure you get the freshest fish, veg and dairy and you are bound to produce a mouth watering pie!

The sauce was silly it was so easy, I essentially just poured some cream on top of the sautéed vegetables and seasoned it and that was that! I recommend giving this a go. I made two individually portioned fish pies, but if you are making a full  family sized one, just double the quantities listed below.

Ingredients:

4- 5 Large Potatoes (avoid using Rooster Potatoes… they make a poor mash)

Large knob of butter

150-200ml cream

100ml milk

1 fillet monkfish

1 fillet of smoked haddock

1 leek

1 fennel bulb

2 scallions

1 garlic clove

Juice of half a lemon

Zest of a lemon

salt & pepper to season

1. Boil the potatoes for about 20 to 30 minutes depending on size. They’re done when a knife cuts easily through them. Mash the potatoes with a knob of butter, a splash of milk and some salt and pepper. You want your mash soft but firm, add a little more milk if necessary.

2. Finely chop the fennel bulb, make sure to keep the fennel herb at the top of the bulb for use later. Slice up your leek and scallions too (a mandolin makes a nice quick job of this.) Just to note, the fennel takes a little longer to soften so slice finely and perhaps start frying a few minutes before adding the rest of the veg. Sauté all the veg until soft, add the cream to the pan of vegetables and add the lemon juice, half the lemon zest, some salt and pepper and half the fennel herbs. Make sure to taste it at this point and add more lemon or pepper if necessary.

3. Fill your dishes until they are half filled with the creamy vegetables and then mix in the uncooked chopped fish pieces. Cover the fish mix with the mashed potato and put into a preheated oven at 180C for 30 to 40 minutes.

4. Two minutes before taking out put a little knob of butter on top of each fish pie. It melts down the edges but I think a drizzle of melted butter over the top of the mashed potato is so inviting! Take out and garnish with the remaining lemon zest and fennel herbs. Enjoy!

Prepare Your Vegetables
Prepare Your Vegetables
Chop Your Fish Into Chunks
Chop Your Fish Into Chunks
Saute Vegetables Until Soft
Saute Vegetables Until Soft
Add Cream and Season
Add Cream and Season
Stir Fish Into Veggy Mix
Stir Fish Into Veggy Mix
Pop These Babies In The Oven
Pop These Babies In The Oven
Ready To Eat
Ready To Eat
Beautiful Fish Pie
Beautiful Fish Pie
Tuck In!
Tuck In!

Ciabatta

The Arbutus Ciabatta
The Arbutus Ciabatta
My Ciabattas
My Ciabattas

This week I started a four week bread making course with Arbutus Breads, and it was something I have been looking forward to for ages and ages. Food is one of my favourite things about coming home to Cork, and Arbutus is one of the best artisan food companies around, it’s certainly the best bakery in Ireland. Their Latvian Rye with caraway seeds is my favourite, but all their breads are amazing, you really have to just taste them to understand where are the hype is coming from.

Declan Ryan was the first Michelen star chef in Ireland with his famous Arbutus Lodge restaurant which he ran for many years. After retiring from the restaurant business he started up the Arbutus Bread Company which is now a household name in Cork for the best in artisan bread. He trained with some of the most famous French bakers using traditional methods. The Arbutus Breads course is ran with his son Darragh one night a week for four weeks, and we will be doing a couple of breads a week.

The first class was really educational and it was so nice to listen to Declan’s stories of how he learn the art of traditional French bread making from great names in baking such as Pierre Nury and Xavier Honorin. He even had an old photo album of pictures of the bakeries he learnt in, the types of bread he made and methods he used which was amazing to get to see.

This week we made Ciabatta which is so handy to have in your repertoire.  I think successful bread making at home is all about confidence. It seems really intimidating at first but you just need to keep trying and not be disheartened by the fact that your first attempt may be an epic fail, and the second may not exactly win a beauty pageant. But persevere and you’ll get the knack quickly enough!

Declan Sharing His Baking Stories From His Travels
Declan Sharing His Baking Stories From His Travels
Declan Showing Us The Treats That Have Been Proving
Declan Showing Us The Treats That Have Been Proving
Darragh's Danishes
Darragh’s Danishes

Ingredients:

420g (approx) T65 or Type 00 flour (Strong white unbleached will do, but try a good deli for some of the T65 or Type 00)

7g salt

64g sourdough starter (for recipe on how to make starter click here)

4g Fresh yeast (Or 2g dried yeast)

190ml water (tepid)

1. Mix ingredients together in a mixer with a paddle attachment, or by hand for 5 to 10 minutes. It’s a very wet loose mix so don’t worry that it looks a bit sloppy. Declan suggested mixing it until it becomes glossy.

2. When all ingredients are combined put the dough in a large container, cover it and let prove  (sit) for around two hours, in a warm area if possible. It should double in size.

3. Take out dough and it knock back on a floured surface. This is as simple as patting down the dough, you can’t knead it again as the loose mixture won’t allow it.

4. You can either leave the dough as is or portion it into smaller pieces for ciabatta buns. Let the dough prove on a floured cloth for another 30 to 60 minutes.

5. Pop into a hot oven at 250C for about 15 minutes or so. Declan said not to get too worried about time, and just go with your gut “When it’s done, it’s done”. It will be done when it sounds hollow when you tap it. You can always make a batch and freeze some smaller individual portions when baked for use when you need.

Ciabatta After First Prove Ready To Portion
Ciabatta After First Prove Ready To Portion
Portioned Ciabatta Ready For Second Prove
Portioned Ciabatta Ready For Second Prove
Yes We May Have Started Eating Them Straight Away...
Yes We May Have Started Eating Them Straight Away…
My Attempt At Home
My Attempt At Home
My Ciabattas
My Ciabattas
Nice And Holey On The Inside
Nice And Holey On The Inside
Worth It For The Smug I Made It Myself Factor
Worth It For The Smug I Made It Myself Factor

Red Velvet Cupcakes

Red Velvet Cake At The Waldorf, New York
Red Velvet Cake At The Waldorf Astoria, New York
So Nice I Ate It Twice
So Nice I Ate It Twice
How Tempting Are These Red Velvet Cupcakes
How Tempting Are These Red Velvet Cupcakes
My Red Velvet Cupcakes
My Red Velvet Cupcakes

Last week I was travelling around New York and managed to try out quite a lot of amazing restaurants, cafes and bakeries in the four days that I was there. I stayed in The Waldorf Astoria over the weekend and while there I learned that Red Velvet cake was actually invented in The Waldorf Hotel! Of course I then had to try a slice there, where it was first created many years ago. And then when I went to my room later that night I was pleasantly surprise to find a little Red Velvet cupcake waiting for me! It was the perfect late night indulgence after an evening exploring New York.

My mum’s birthday was last weekend, and we threw her a surprise party and so I decided to make a few trays of Red Velvet cupcakes for dessert as I was curious to try them out. They’re actually very easy to make, and really delicious. I used the Hummingbird Cafe recipe, and it was perfect.

They taste delicious, are easy to make and look very impressive.  They have a cocoa vanilla taste, and the buttermilk makes them really soft and moist… I don’t think I need to explain why the cream cheese icing tastes so good! This is definitely a recipe to try when you have guests calling.

Crazy Time Square
Exploring Crazy Time Square
Times Square, New York
Times Square, New York

Cake Ingredients (Makes 12):

60g unsalted butter at room temperature
150g caster sugar
1 egg
20g cocoa powder
40ml red food colouring (I used 25 and make up the difference with more vanilla extract)
½ tsp vanilla extract
120ml buttermilk
150g plain flour
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda/ bread soda
1½ tsp white vinegar
1 x 12-hole cupcake tray, lined with paper cases

For the frosting:
250g icing sugar, sifted
40g unsalted butter, at room temperature
125g cream cheese, cold (don’t use the light stuff.. full fat is the way to go)

1. Preheat the oven to 170°C. Beat together the butter and the sugar until light and fluffy and well mixed. Turn the mixer up to high speed, slowly add the egg and beat until everything is well incorporated.

2. In a separate bowl, mix together the cocoa powder, red food colouring and vanilla extract to make a very thick, dark paste. Add to the butter mixture and mix thoroughly until evenly combined and coloured. Turn the mixer down to slow speed and slowly pour in half the buttermilk.

3. Beat until well mixed, then add half the flour and beat until everything is well incorporated. Repeat this process until all the buttermilk and flour have been added. Beat until you have a smooth, even mixture. Add the bicarbonate of soda and vinegar (they will fizz up which is kind of cool!). Beat until well mixed.

5. To make the frosting beat the icing sugar the remaining 40g of butter together until the mixture comes together and is well mixed. Add the cream cheese in one go and beat it until it is completely incorporated, light and fluffy. Be careful not to overbeat, as it can quickly become runny.

6. Spoon the mixture into the paper cases until two-thirds full and bake in the preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the sponge bounces back when touched. A skewer inserted in the centre should come out clean. Leave the cupcakes to cool completely before icing them. You can use a piping bag, but I just smeared the icing on with the back of a teaspoon. You can use crumbled crumbs of the cake mixture to sprinkle on top of the icing. Delicious!

Make Your Red Cocoa Paste
Make Your Red Cocoa Paste
Nice Pinky Red Batter
Nice Pinky Red Batter
Add Bread Soda and Vinegar... Fizzy!
Add Bread Soda and Vinegar… Fizzy!
Ready For The Oven
Ready For The Oven
Wait Until Totally Cooled Before Icing
Wait Until Totally Cooled Before Icing
Ice With Cream Cheese Icing
Ice With Cream Cheese Icing
Crumb One Cupcake For Topping
Crumb One Cupcake For Topping
My Trays Of Red Velvet Cupcakes
My Trays Of Red Velvet Cupcakes

Wild Mushroom Risotto

Delicious Risotto
Delicious Risotto
Wild Mushroom Risotto Served With Basil Oil
Wild Mushroom Risotto Served With Basil Oil
Food Porn Close Up
Food Porn Close Up

A few weeks ago I made this mushroom risotto and it was so amazing (if I do say so myself) that I’ve made it a few more times since! Risotto was one of those things that I put off making as I perceived it to be really hard as people are always giving out about “getting a bad risotto” etc, but actually it’s ridiculously simple! Just stir, stir, stir! I was at the Mahon Point Farmer’s Market a few weeks ago and bumped into Joe McNamee who quickly pointed me in the direction of Ballyhoura Mushrooms, which apparently were an absolute must buy! He was right of course, and I’m so glad he did point them out as I usually have tunnel vision and go straight to Gubbeen, Arbutus, O’Conaill’s and Flynn’s Kitchen!

Mahon Point Farmers Market
Mahon Point Farmers Market
Gubbeen Stall at Mahon Farmers Market
Gubbeen Stall at Mahon Farmers Market
Arbutus Bread Stall, My Favourite
Arbutus Bread Stall, My Favourite
Ballyhoura Bag of Magic
Ballyhoura Bag of Magic

Ballyhoura Mushroom do the most amazing range of mushrooms, I walked away with a bag Shiitake and Oyster mushroom of all different shapes, sizes and colours, and knew instantly I had to make a risotto with these. I wanted them to be the focal point of whatever I was making. Alas, I crumbled when I got home and ended up fying them in butter and salt and having them on toast! However, I did eventually make a risotto later that week and it was a beauty! I had eaten all my Ballyhoura beauties though, but thankfully my local greengrocer (Evergreen on Camden Street, Dublin) had a great selection!

This recipe went down a treat! I used a little of Glenisk’s creme fraiche and parmesan and topped it with some Basil Oil from Flynn’s Kitchen (also bought at the Mahon Market). However I made it again the following week and instead used Corleggy Raw Goats Milk Cheese that I bought in the Temple Bar market, and that gave it a lovely kick as it has such a strong flavour. I suppose where I’m going with this food rant, is feel free to play around with ingredients! Enjoy!

Serves 2:

200g Mushrooms (I used Shiitake, Oyster Mushrooms & Chanterelles)

120g – 150g Arborio Rice (depending if you have a hungry man eating this with you! Usually 60g to 75 per person)

1/2 Litre of Chicken Stock

150ml White Wine

2 Tablespoons Creme Fraiche

1 handful of grated Parmesan Cheese

2 Shallots Finely Slices

2 Garlic Cloves finely sliced/crushed

1 tbso Olive Oil

Salt & Pepper

1. In a heated heavy bottomed pot with a little salt, pepper and olive oil, lightly fry the mushrooms. Shiitake take a little longer than the Oysters and Chantarelles to fry, so do these first and add the others after a minute or two. When cooked (not soggy!) set aside.

2. In the same pan add the shallots, garlic, oil and rice and stir for about 2 minutes. Don’t let the garlic or shallots burn, keep the heat medium low. Add the white wine and stir until it has been soaked up.

3. Put the litre of stock in a pot over a simmering heat, and add a ladle full of stock at a time to the rice. Do not add any more stock, until the previous ladle full has been soaked up. Make sure to stir constantly.

4. When all the stock has been soaked up the rice should be cooked through (around 30 minutes), if not, add a little more stock ladle by ladle until done. You want it slightly Al Dente though, not soggy/mushy.

5. Add back in the mushrooms and keep stirring. Add in the creme fraiche (you can add a little more if you like!), and the parmesan. When it all has been combined serve in warm bowls, and with a dash of basil oil if you have some.

6. Enjoy with a nice glass of wine!

Lightly Fry Your Mushrooms
Lightly Fry Your Mushrooms
Set Aside Once Cooked Through
Set Aside Once Cooked Through
Add Wine To Shallots, Garlic & Rice
Add Wine To Shallots, Garlic & Rice
Start Adding Stock One Ladle At A Time
Start Adding Stock One Ladle At A Time
Stir in Mushrooms, Creme Fraiche & Parmesan
Stir in Mushrooms, Creme Fraiche & Parmesan
Ready!
Ready!
Delicious Wild Mushroom Risotto
Delicious Wild Mushroom Risotto
So Delicious!
So Delicious!